the Polygon blog - your moisture management resource

Global Cement Consumption to Rise through 2019 & Beyond

Construction Drying

With global growth facilitating positive construction trends, cement consumption is on the rise. World Cement projected in 2016 that the market for construction aggregates would grow to 51.7 billion tons in 2019, an advancement rate of 5.2 percent annually. As residential construction and infrastructure investments dominate the market, more contractors will look to the benefits of concrete drying solutions to facilitate the meeting of project deadlines, as well as ensure the quality and performance of the aggregate materials used.

Read

5 Concrete Facts: Global Cement Production is on the Rise

Construction Drying

In fast-growing economies and emerging markets, cement is as vital as oil. The material is among the most versatile as it’s essential for infrastructure, roads and building construction. With annual revenues in the hundreds of billions of dollars, cement is also a big business. With cement production on the rise, the need for construction drying solutions will also increase to keep contractors in pace with the fast-paced market.

Read

Concrete Pavement Technology Keeps America Moving

Construction Drying

One of the simplest things to take for granted when traveling is the concrete beneath the tires. Throughout the last century, concrete has played a major role in the United States’ transportation systems, from creating new roads to repairing existing highways. The country’s highway system, including its nearly-45,000-mile interstate system, carries about 40 percent of total traffic. This figure includes 90 percent of tourist traffic and 70 percent of commercial traffic. Pairing concrete preparation with construction drying solutions is crucial to the nation’s transit infrastructure as it improves a road’s safety and minimizes disruptions to traffic.

Read

Ensuring Successful Productions of Greenhouse Crops

Temporary Climate Solutions

Regions throughout the world are known for their particular crops because of their climate profiles. North America, for example, is a major producer of sugarcane, almonds and strawberries. Western Asia produces rye, barley and wheat. The Middle East grows saffron and cotton. Thanks to technological advances in horticulture and farming, crops no longer have to be limited to their native geographical locations, climates and seasons. A growing number of regions that depend on food imports are becoming more self-reliable with greenhouses that use temporary climate control solutions that mimic the conditions needed to produce a greater variety of crops. The technologies make food and other goods more abundant in regions affected by poor soil and water scarcity, and deliver seasonal crops to consumers year-round.

Read

Do Documents Decrease in Value or Credibility Once They are Scanned?

Document Scanning

Before the days of digital documents, the standards regarding what was an original document and what was a copy were clear. When it came to the legal validity of a copy or fax, an institution had to determine if the electronic record was evidence of a contract and if the signatures within it served as proof of a contact’s acceptance. When fax machines rose in popularity, few legal courts and companies accepted facsimiles with signatures as “originals” until 1995. Today, electronically transmitted documents and faxes often suffice as proof of an agreement or at least serve as interim evidence until the original is made available. Whether a scanned or electronic document is as credible or valuable as the original depends on a business’s document management procedures and the document in question.

Read